Category: Craft

comparing e-commerce platforms for makers

emoji stamps in progress wipAfter more than eight years, I’ve decided to close up my shop on Etsy. Lately I’ve just had more negative things to say about the service than positive, and I figured it was time to put my money where my mouth was and move on. (I’ll probably write something more about while I left later, but Abby Glassenberg — who loves Etsy, for the record —has a comprehensive list of the common Etsy complaints here.)

To find a new home for my handmade shop, I spent the last few days creating this chart comparing ecommerce options for makers & designers. It includes the major craft marketplaces as well as standalone ecommerce platforms that let you set up a standalone shop fairly simply, without needing your own website or host. I also calculated the fees each of the various platforms charge for four separate sales scenarios. I found it very interesting to dig into the numbers and check out my options, and there are definite trends that come up when you compare the fees for small volume sales to high-volume sales.

Dec. 22 update: I’ve added a column noting whether the service has made any statement or offered advice about VATMOSS and the 2015 European value added tax rule changes.

February 2015 update: You likely arrived here from my piece on Wired.com: How Etsy Alienated Its Crafters and Lost Its Soul. Welcome! I hope you find the information useful. 

October 2015 update: Amazon just launched its Handmade vertical, so I’ve added that to the list. 

grazing + finding creative inspiration

put a mustache on it handmade card, portlandia parody

A consumer packaged goods expert recently divulged to me that she never, ever looks at her competition. That really took me by surprise, because I always over-research everything. (My local branch librarians know all about me and my extensive interlibrary loan requests.)

Instead of looking at the competition, she told me, she examines parallels. What else do people in the target market desire? [Related: this customer profile worksheet from my book.] How can she make the product remind them of those other things, or draw on the best qualities to incorporate into her own design? For a high-end chocolate product, for example, she might look at Sephora’s prestige cosmetics packaging for inspiration. She pays no mind to Hershey and Nestle.

She confirmed what I’ve been thinking lately, that the best ideas come when you’re looking where no one else is. I love trolling through old books and magazines. You might love hiking in the woods or beachcombing or looking at art or gardening or visiting factories. All of these places are rife with things that could inspire you to make something you’ve never made before. Chris Glass refers to this as grazing. Cows do nothing but chew on grass all day. It doesn’t seem like they’re doing much of anything. But if they didn’t graze all day, they couldn’t produce milk. It might not feel like you’re working when you graze, but without taking that time to browse and nibble and ruminate and digest, you can’t make anything of value. This video of Chris Glass’s talk from Creative Mornings Cincinnati (which includes his bit about grazing) is 43 minutes of awesome:

I know a lot of writers, artists and designers who straight up don’t read blogs about their industries. When you spend a lot of time “keeping up” it can start to feel like an echo chamber. There’s a difference between keeping up on the news and falling into a state of obsessed self-flagellation. This is even applicable to journalists. Sure, there are lots of interesting blogs about the journalism business, and it’s important to follow your competitors to make sure your coverage is on point. But staying inside your bubble of contemporaries isn’t going to help you find great story ideas. Lisa Congdon recently illustrated this quote from Jack London: “You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”

Hunting down your inspiration should also help with avoiding committing plagiarism and following trends. Craft trends bug the hell out of me. It’s not that I hate mustaches (except that I totally do) — my problem is more with the idea that some crafters feel like they have to jump on a bandwagon to be successful. It’s much better to be a trendsetter than a trend follower, and to do that, you have to look outside your field. If you’re a crafter, stop scrolling endlessly through Pinterest. When you’re trying to develop a new product or design, look at anything other than other crafters: grocery store displays, florists, flea markets, old magazines, architecture books — whatever gets you going.

I also kind of hate pre-packaged “inspiration” for crafters, designers and artists. The idea that someone can hand you a pile of stuff to be inspired by seems counterproductive. It just keeps the same aesthetics and motifs circulating. (I also really really have no patience for step-by-step craft books. Partly because I hate following directions, but also because I don’t see the point in making something to look exactly like something someone else made. You feel me?)

washi tape weaving

We recently had an Etsy #craftparty here in Cincinnati, and as people were arriving, I made examples of what people could do with the materials we had. But I wasn’t making things for people to imitate or really following the provided instructions at all. I let myself go with the flow and make whatever felt right at the time. Being truly inspired is allowing yourself to be in the moment and do what you feel. And all of what you’ve seen and read and digested before helps you find your way.

san francisco crafty workshops!

My first adventure of 2013 (hopefully the first of many) is going to San Francisco for about a week in February and March. I love the Bay Area will take any excuse to spend time there. I’ll be teaching some workshops at Makeshift Society, which I’m so stoked to finally check out. Here are the three crafty/DIY workshops I’ll be doing the first week of March:

get your book published workshop sf

Get Your Book Published

Monday, March 4, 6 to 7 p.m.

Do you have a killer book idea but don’t know how to get it published? I have plenty of practical advice for you. In this hour-long workshop, we’ll talk about:

  • developing your book idea
  • preparing a proposal
  • finding an agent
  • pitching it to publishers
  • actually writing the dang thing
  • how to make it a success

Cost: $30 per person ($25 for Makeshift Society members) — REGISTER HERE

coptic stitch bookbinding workshop san francisco

Coptic Stitch Bookbinding Workshop

Tuesday, March 5, 6 to 7 p.m.

I’ll teach you how to sew a sketchbook in just one hour in this workshop. The coptic bookbinding technique is great for journals because the books lay completely flat when open and you can make them out of any paper you like. We’ll even send you home with a few essential tools and resources for binding books on your own.

Cost: $50 per person ($45 for Makeshift Society members) — includes all materials — REGISTER HERE

zine making happy hour san francisco

Zine Making Happy Hour

Wednesday, March 6, 6 to 8 p.m.

Kick off those heels, loosen your collar and come make a zine at Makeshift Society after work. These photocopied little magazines can be anything you want them to be — a manifesto, a bitchfest, an art project or a dream. We’ll provide the scissors, glue sticks, paper, ephemera, examples and wine — you bring your friends and your ideas.

Cost: $25 per person ($20 for Makeshift Society members) — includes all materials and lotsa wine — REGISTER HERE

craft trends for 2013

Two years ago, my friend Paul and I created CRAFTSarethenewCRAFTS.com, an indie craft trend generator inspired by Barack Obama is Your New Bicycle. We decided to give the site a fresh update for 2013, with new craft trends and a new look. (Helvetica is so hot right now.) So if you’re trying to figure out what the next trend is going to be in the Etsy scene, look no further.

craft trends 2013 chevrons

craft trends 2013 city maps

craft trends 2013 beards

craft trends 2013 state maps

giveaway: 2013 etsy dayplanner!

Etsy surprised me with an envelope full of goodies recently, and included in it was this gorgeous 2013 calendar/planner. So cute! The chipboard cover looks letterpressed with gold filigree, and the insides are well-designed, too.

etsy 2013 day planner

etsy-planner-2

I already have a 2013 dayplanner started (Paperblanks forever), but I can’t let this beauty go to waste! Leave a comment on this post, and I’ll select someone at random to send it to. It’s my Christmas gift to you!

Edited to add: I guess I should’ve put an end date on this! Post yr comment by noon on Dec. 24, and I’ll pick a person at random on Christmas Eve!

Edited again to add: The random number is 8, which means the winner is Vicky! :)

random number

last-minute gift ideas for crafters and makers

division of labor posters, letterpress

Division of Labor letterpress posters on Fab.com.

Still trying to wrap up your Christmas shopping? I’m nearly done, but I know it can be hard to buy for the makers, designers and crafters in your life. After all, what could you give them that they couldn’t just make themselves? My guide has 7 places to get gifts sure to please any crafty person (including me).

Inventables

I just discovered this shop this week, and it’s a regular valhalla for makers. Can’t decide whether your crafty friends would prefer powerless illuminating tubing or a giant hunk of aluminum foam? Get ’em an Inventables gift certificate for any amount you want, and let them choose for themselves.

Moo

Moo prints cards and stickers on demand from your own images — you can make all 100 of your business cards look the same, or you can go for Printfinity and put a different picture on every single one of them. Crazy, right? Give a friend a gift card (available in denominations of $10, $20, $30, $50, $70 and $100), and print away!

Tattly

Temporary tattoos have never looked so good. Big-name designers lend their visions to these just-add-water wonders. Tattly’s got a few curated $25 gift boxes that look real sweet. You can also give a gift card in any amount you like, or give a Tattly subscription and keep your friends in temporary tattoos for six months.

American Science & Surplus

This is a well-kept crafty secret, like a Big Lots for nerds. (And I love that along with every product photo they also have a hand-drawn version of the item.) American Science & Surplus is all amazing deals on things you didn’t know you ever wanted: glass test tubes, fallout shelter signs, donut magnets and “robot partz.” SciPlus doesn’t do gift cards, but you’ve got about a week left to place orders to arrive before Christmas.

Photojojo

If you’re sweating a gift for a shutterbug friend, stop right here. Photojojo sells amazing smartphone accessories and camera accoutrements, like recycled film roll magnets and Holga iPhone lensesGift cards come in denominations of $10, $25, $50, $100 or $200, and if you pick an amount of $25 or over, you can get it mailed with a free tiny camera keychain.

Fab

I actually had to unsubscribe myself from Fab’s email newsletters because there were just too many things I wanted to buy! It’s just ludicrous how many well-designed things can live in one online shop. Fab just started offering gift cards — you can get them in denominations of $25 and up.

Field Notes

Oh, I love these Futura-heavy notebooks so much — I have two in my bag at this very moment. Grab a bunch of the original kraft-covered Field Notes, or select one of the limited edition color packs. You can also get a subscription for $97 that’ll keep you in notebooks all year. And by “you” I mean whoever you’re getting a gift for. (You.)

Etsy

The biggest handmade marketplace just started offering gift cards this year, in denominations of $25, $50, $100 or $250. They can be used in any U.S. Etsy shop that accepts direct checkout payments, and you can have the gift cards emailed or print them out at home. I’d be happy to get an Etsy gift card, but as a seller, I’m also really excited for everybody else to get Etsy gift cards so I have a strong sales month in January! :)

Edited to add: I just received a subscription to Whimseybox, which is a great addition to this list! It’s like Birchbox for crafters, or Pinterest in your mailbox. Every month you’ll get a reusable box with a DIY project, instructions and an art print. You can send a friend (or yourself) a gift subscription for 3 months ($45), 6 months ($90) or a year ($165).