Tagged: freelance

freelance financial transparency

profit! freelance budget spreadsheets

This piece in the New York Times yesterday about writers getting asked to work for free reminded me about the ongoing struggle freelancers have to get paid.

I’m a big believer in fiscal transparency — to the point where I’ve been known to ask people questions about money that I later realized were super awkward. But for real: If freelancers don’t talk about money, we’re all less equipped to negotiate for ourselves and value our own work properly. (Margo blogged about this last month in a post on financial habits.)

Creative freelancers, I know you deal in images and words and concepts, not math. For everyone who doesn’t feel adept at crunching numbers, I am here for you. Though I haven’t taken a math class since high school, that last one I took was honors calculus. I was a straight-up mathlete, y’all. The business side of creative enterprise is endlessly fascinating to me, and spreadsheets are like my catnip.

Without further ado, here is my freelance budget spreadsheet template for your fiscal enjoyment. Feel free to download it to your Google Drive or desktop, and tweak it and make it your own. It includes three tabs: The first is a year-at-a-glance budget projection sheet. The second is an invoice tracker that lets you see what invoices are unpaid and how much you’re bringing in per month. And the third tab is a time tracker that you can duplicate for every one of your clients to keep track of time and invoicing.

I developed these spreadsheets in my first year of freelance life, and I’m sharing them with you because every freelancer should be the captain of their own finances. I hope it helps you get ready to make 2014 your most successful year of freelancing ever!

BONUS! Here are some of my favorite freelance business books:

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never network alone

Q. Do you have any tips for networking? I’ve debated asking a fellow freelancer about getting work, but I’m afraid of stepping on her toes.

A. When I started freelancing, I thought that meeting other freelancers was the best way to get gigs. They get gigs, and I want gigs, so they can give me some of their gigs, right? But I quickly realized that other freelancers aren’t the people I should be hitting up for work. (Those are the people who control the budgets — editors, project managers, publishers.)

Networking with other freelancers is a great idea, but you should just approach them human to human. We all have people who we would like to be when we grow up — and the dream networking situation with them would involve porting all their knowledge and connections straight into our brainmeats. But play it cool. If you’re desperate for work and approach everybody as a conduit to finding work, yes, it can be awkward. (Grilling strangers for work leads is never a good look.) Networking, when you’re doing it right, feels like making a new friend — or at least pleasantly interacting with a coworker you like. And when you’ve shown them that you’re cool (even if you’re freaking on the inside), they’ll be much more likely down the road to potentially share leads or introduce you to other people.

The best way to avoid feeling like you’re encroaching on someone’s territory is to realize that we’re all in this together. You’re a freelancer, I’m a freelancer: Let’s get together and dish. An email to a fellow freelancer might look something like this:

Hey, [awesomely successful person]!

I’m a freelancer also living in [your city], working on [whatever you do]. I really loved that project you did about [an awesome thing]. Could I buy you a coffee some time? It’d be great to meet up and share war stories!

Recently I set myself a goal of meeting one new person a week, whether it’s by going to a networking event or reaching out to a specific person. My trick is that I don’t only aim to meet people who I might get work from. Sure, I love to meet editors and publishers, but I’ve also met other writers, marketing people, tech entrepreneurs and nonprofit folks.  I love going to networking events where editorial freelancers are in the minority, because meeting people from other fields is really interesting. And as a bonus, I’m likely also a curious specimen to them.

[Tangent: Don’t be that guy who gives his business card to literally every single person at a networking event, even people he didn’t talk to. One deep connection is worth more than 100 shallow ones.]

An acquaintance here in Cincinnati seems to know everybody and frequently offers to help me like it’s no big deal. At first I was like, what’s your game, friend? Who offers to help without expecting something in return? But then I read “Never Eat Alone” and totally got it. Networking is about focusing on what you can give other people. She’s a connector of the highest order. She helps people by meeting everybody and learning what they’re working on, and then she connects the dots by introducing the right people to each other at the right times. As one of the recipients of her professional matchmaking, I can tell you that I have frequently introduced other people to her. The song never ends. (Related: Ann Friedman’s Shine Theory)

By saying that networking is all about giving, I don’t mean to imply that good networking involves divulging all your proprietary info and personal contacts to anyone who asks for them. (I protect my best editorial contacts with all the power of Xenu.) When you connect successfully with a fellow freelancer, what you walk away with might not be a job but a rec of a must-read blog or a referral to another person you should meet or just a new lunch buddy. And when you meet a freelancer in need, you share alike. You’ve been there.

getting work and keeping work (neil gaiman and gifs)

This Neil Gaiman commencement speech was mentioned recently on NPR and is now available as a book, “Make Good Art,” designed by Chip Kidd. The thing that really stood out to me in the interview was his two-of-three rule (this “secret knowledge” for freelancers starts around minute 14):

You get work however you get work. People keep working in a freelance world — and more and more of today’s world is freelance — because their work is good, and because they are easy to get along with, and because they deliver the work on time. And you don’t even need all three. Two out of three is fine. People will tolerate how unpleasant you are if your work is good and you deliver it on time. They’ll forgive the lateness of the work if it’s good, and if they like you. And you don’t have to be as good as the others if you’re on time and it’s always a pleasure to hear from you.”

This is so true. I’ve made decisions based on these three attributes, subconsciously, as a magazine editor assigning articles. And I often doubt my abilities as a writer (Gaiman also talks about impostor syndrome in his speech), so I make it my business to always be on time and as pleasant as possible to work with so I at least get that two out of three.

And if nothing else, I can make rad GIFs (jifs):

freelance venn diagram based on neil gaiman

After hearing Neil Gaiman on the radio, I came up with this hypothetical rule of threes specifically for pitching magazine articles. Everybody knows that to sell a story to a magazine, you need a solid topic with a fresh angle. But you also need at least two of the following attributes:

  • Access: Do you have physical proximity to the subject matter, or a personal connection that gets you access where other reporters cannot?
  • Expertise: Have you written about the subject before or have an advanced understanding of it?
  • Reputation: Are you known by the publication’s audience as a trusted voice or by its editors as a reliable writer?

pitching magazine articles infographic

If you have all three, your pitch is way strong, and you might be a wizard. But if you have two out of the three, you still have a really good chance that your pitch is going to get picked up.

If you’re held in good esteem by magazine editors and have access to people or places, you might get by with being a novice in the subject matter. (Example: Susan Orlean goes to a local cream cheese factory to write about collusion with the bagel industry.) If the magazine’s never heard of you before, you need to have written about the topic before and have access to the right interview subjects. (Example: You’ve been reporting on a local university for years and have all the background info on a recent scandal to pitch an in-depth piece to a national outlet.) Or if you’re a known entity to editors and are an expert in the subject matter, the magazine might help you get access to the people or places of note — or be more likely to straight-up assign stuff to you. (Example: You’ve written about  health policy for a magazine many times before, so you’re their first pick to profile the new surgeon general.)

That’s my theory of how to get a pitch picked up. Fellow freelancers, what do you think?

#freelancechat

vintage coworking freelancingJoin me for a casual Google+ Hangout about getting started in freelancing for magazines! All are welcome — both newbies and experienced journalists.

I had this idea from some fellow Kent State alums asking me questions about how I went freelance. And I previously wrote about how to pitch magazine articles and a treatise on how to get paid, so you know this is something I can talk about forever.

It’ll be like a live FAQ, from 6 to 7 p.m. Sunday, March 24. The link is below, and if I get the Google+ Hangout to work correctly, it’ll be available to watch afterward, too!

OMG I quit my job

quitting your job for fun and profitI totally quit my job last week.

It wasn’t some kind of take-this-job-and-shove-it table-flipping experience. It was totally civilized and without raised voices or tears. I gave five weeks’ notice, and my last day is going to be Sept. 4.

So what’s my deal? I remained employed for the entirety of the great recession—no small feat. I’ve worked on some awesome magazines and went to sweet conferences. I learned a ton and grew a lot.

But after five years at my company, I felt myself getting burned out. I had little energy for all the side projects I have going on. And with my new book coming out this month and the big holiday craft show coming shortly, I was feeling way more tired than inspired. And that’s no way to live.

So, as of Sept. 5, I’ll be a self-employed person, and I am so excited. I’ve got a few gigs lined up as a freelance writer and editor, and I’ll be looking for more. Do you need someone who knows how to hustle? Here’s what I’m good at:

  • writing about design, art, craft, entrepreneurship, web culture and nerds
  • editing basically anything
  • proofreading and copy editing
  • writing and editing email newsletters
  • polishing resumes and writing kickass cover letters
  • social media strategy and execution
  • speaking about creative business and entrepreneurship
  • organizing and putting on events
  • personal assistant kinds of stuff, like booking travel and dealing with surly post office ladies
  • bookbinding, printmaking and other crafty things
  • writing song parodies
  • finding awesome flea markets and vintage shops wherever I go

If you need someone to help you with any of these things, don’t hesitate to get in touch. I’m very available as of Oct. 1.

My first order of business as a full-time freelancer is an epic road trip/book tour to promote The Crafty Superstar Ultimate Craft Business Guide in September—details on appearances to come. And I’ve got an idea for my third book that I’m just dying to get started on. Let’s do this!