getting work and keeping work (neil gaiman and gifs)

This Neil Gaiman commencement speech was mentioned recently on NPR and is now available as a book, “Make Good Art,” designed by Chip Kidd. The thing that really stood out to me in the interview was his two-of-three rule (this “secret knowledge” for freelancers starts around minute 14):

You get work however you get work. People keep working in a freelance world — and more and more of today’s world is freelance — because their work is good, and because they are easy to get along with, and because they deliver the work on time. And you don’t even need all three. Two out of three is fine. People will tolerate how unpleasant you are if your work is good and you deliver it on time. They’ll forgive the lateness of the work if it’s good, and if they like you. And you don’t have to be as good as the others if you’re on time and it’s always a pleasure to hear from you.”

This is so true. I’ve made decisions based on these three attributes, subconsciously, as a magazine editor assigning articles. And I often doubt my abilities as a writer (Gaiman also talks about impostor syndrome in his speech), so I make it my business to always be on time and as pleasant as possible to work with so I at least get that two out of three.

And if nothing else, I can make rad GIFs (jifs):

freelance venn diagram based on neil gaiman

After hearing Neil Gaiman on the radio, I came up with this hypothetical rule of threes specifically for pitching magazine articles. Everybody knows that to sell a story to a magazine, you need a solid topic with a fresh angle. But you also need at least two of the following attributes:

  • Access: Do you have physical proximity to the subject matter, or a personal connection that gets you access where other reporters cannot?
  • Expertise: Have you written about the subject before or have an advanced understanding of it?
  • Reputation: Are you known by the publication’s audience as a trusted voice or by its editors as a reliable writer?

pitching magazine articles infographic

If you have all three, your pitch is way strong, and you might be a wizard. But if you have two out of the three, you still have a really good chance that your pitch is going to get picked up.

If you’re held in good esteem by magazine editors and have access to people or places, you might get by with being a novice in the subject matter. (Example: Susan Orlean goes to a local cream cheese factory to write about collusion with the bagel industry.) If the magazine’s never heard of you before, you need to have written about the topic before and have access to the right interview subjects. (Example: You’ve been reporting on a local university for years and have all the background info on a recent scandal to pitch an in-depth piece to a national outlet.) Or if you’re a known entity to editors and are an expert in the subject matter, the magazine might help you get access to the people or places of note — or be more likely to straight-up assign stuff to you. (Example: You’ve written about  health policy for a magazine many times before, so you’re their first pick to profile the new surgeon general.)

That’s my theory of how to get a pitch picked up. Fellow freelancers, what do you think?

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6 comments

  1. Dreampunk Geek

    Reblogged this on dreampunk geek and commented:
    If you do nothing else today, take 20 minutes to listen to this speech by Neil Gaiman. (A favorite author and hero of mine.) He is not only inspiring, but a role model, (and I love his accent.) Trust me, you will feel ready to take on the world after hearing what he has to say.

  2. Julie Vargo

    The same is true in marketing materials development. You can have it fast, cheap, correct. Pick two.

  3. Pingback: Magpie Monday on Wednesday | Robert E. Stutts
  4. Pingback: Ben Matthews | Tell your freelance story and help others go freelance! - Ben Matthews

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